[Home] [Downloads] [Search] [Help/forum]

Substitutions

All messages may contain %-substitutions. Some common ones return pronouns if the player's gender is set. They are:

%s subjective Name, he, she, it, they.
%o objective Name, him, her, it, them.
%p possessive Name's, his, her, its, their.
%a absolute possessive Name's, his, hers, its, theirs.
%N player's name Name.

Other possible substitutions are:

%# player number #<actor's number>. Equivalent to num(%N)
%@ caller number #<caller's number>. No equivalent. Initially equal to %#, but changes when things like u() are called.
%! object number #<message holder's number>. Equivalent to num(me)
%l location number #<actor's location>. Like loc(%N). This works even if the LOC() function would normally not, since the enactor has "volunteered" his location by triggering another object.
%c last command Text of last command, before evaluation.
%r newline Carriage return and newline in output. Note that this counts as two characters, in functions like strlen(). (puts "\r\n")
%t tab Tab character in output.
%b blank Space in output.
%qN r(N) The equivalent of r(N), a register set by a setq() function.
%? accounting Current values of function invocation count and recursion depth count.

If you need a '%', use %%. Case matters; for example, "%S" returns "His", "%s" returns "his".

Example:


 @ofail teapot=burns %p hand on the hot teapot.

would, for a male, return "burns his hand on the hot teapot."

HALTed objects do not perform substitutions.

Other substitutions, such as %va-%vz, %wa-%wz, %xa-%xz, and %0-%9 may also be used and are equivalent to v(?) where ? is a-z or 0-9. In these substitutions and pronoun substitutions, if the first letter of the name is capitalized, the first letter of the substitution will also be capitalized.


[Back] [Home]
Written by Nick Gammon - 5K

Comments to Gammon Software support

[Best viewed with any browser - 2K]    Internet Contents Rating Association (ICRA) - 2K    [Web site powered by FutureQuest.Net]

Page updated on Wednesday, 15 December 2004